In quest of Success: How to Discover What Motivates Your Children

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So how do you identify what will motivate each of your children to do the best in everything they do? You will first require listening and get to know your child. That means spending time with them and getting to know their likes and dislikes.

Talk to them and learn their specific needs. One of the hardest roles in parenting is motivating your child. Each child is independent and even twins can’t always be motivated in the similar way.

Once you’ve learned what motivates your children to do things on their own, to motivate each of your children, you can expand on that and find individual ways. Motivation requirements will change, as they grow older, mature, and they will need various motivations.

Be a Best Motivator of your children

Try a change of direction with your children. Praise them for the little things and they will begin to see that behaving and getting good grades in school is something worth working for. Only you know what the best goal is to act as a motivator for your children.

Positive motivations work much better than threats and punishment. Those sometimes work in the opposite way and end making matters worse. Most people react to positive reinforcement and praise than they do negative criticism and harshness.

Make Sweet your Child’s Tooth

If they have a sweet tooth, it’s possible to buy sugar-free candies and even sugar free chocolate. A great motivator I found with my grandchildren is a promise of a Popsicle after toys are picked up. I make the Popsicles myself out of real fruit juice so they are getting a treat and something healthy.

Two for one, not bad is it? Motivation for good behavior can be many different goals, when children are small. One child can be motivated to be on his best behavior by simply giving him a snack as a gift for being good.

As they grow a little older, a sucker or Popsicle won’t do the trick any more. They need something they are more interested in. Some may respond to a goal of being able to spend an extra half hour watching TV or playing videos.

Others may be motivated by extra playtime, or increased phone use. You will know what your kids will act in response to by listening to them and tuning into their feelings. How about an extra trip to the library, or a good children’s museum, these are magnificent goals to work for.

Make it a fun time and strengthen the positive feelings that come from happy family outings. Never take too lightly how important it is to your child to spend quality time. In keeping your child motivated to grow into the person you want him or her to be, quality, happy time, is valuable.

Goals Change with Maturity

Of course, when they reach the teenage years, you have a new ball game. With the maturity of the teen, goals change. Goals or motivations sometimes have to change daily. If your son’s passion is driving, then an enduring goal of earning his own car could be just the ticket to keeping his grades up and staying out of trouble.

Just like schools use their sports programs to keep participants studying and doing what is right, so can any parent do the similar thing. Do you have a child that has artistic talent? A trip to the local artists supply store is the perfect goal for them.

Grandma’s House

Maybe the one motivational goal you can give your children is time with them. My grandchildren are small, but their goal is to be the one who was good for the week so they can be present at Grandma’s house to spend the night. It has gotten the kids through trial days at preschool, shots for school physicals, and stays at the hospital.

Each child has their own unusual activity that they do with Grandma and they know they will have Grandma’s attention the whole time they are here. That’s not spoiling them, it is spending time to, really get to know them and what makes them want to perform and do good things.

If you know your child has a special interest, then you can promote that interest into positive reinforcement goals.

Posted in: MotivationParenting

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